My Interface Video

An Editing Project for New Media Class

For my self directed New Media project I intend to follow along my interface theme of the exploration of the idea of home. I have been looking at home as a delicate idea/feeling that can only exist within a set structure- ie: a relationship, a personal comfort, a routine, or of course, a building.
As demonstrated within my storyboard, I intend to film a series of rooms, using panning (horizontal, vertical, circular, etc) shots to capture the rooms, and motion cuts to cut between the different scenes.
By doing this, I want to show different places in which people make their home. The shape of the rooms and their walls are an important symbol to represent the structure which enables home to exist. I have also considered filming important personal possessions up close and people’s expressions and gestures and incorporating these scenes into the sweeping pans of the rooms. 

For my self directed New Media project I intend to follow along my interface theme of the exploration of the idea of home. I have been looking at home as a delicate idea/feeling that can only exist within a set structure- ie: a relationship, a personal comfort, a routine, or of course, a building.

As demonstrated within my storyboard, I intend to film a series of rooms, using panning (horizontal, vertical, circular, etc) shots to capture the rooms, and motion cuts to cut between the different scenes.

By doing this, I want to show different places in which people make their home. The shape of the rooms and their walls are an important symbol to represent the structure which enables home to exist. I have also considered filming important personal possessions up close and people’s expressions and gestures and incorporating these scenes into the sweeping pans of the rooms. 

Six Shot Sequence (demonstrating the rules of continuous editing)

requirements:

-2 characters

-use of cutting on motion technique

-compress time

-continuity of space and time (108’ rule, etc.)

… … …

credits:

Storyboard by group

Filmed by Monica McGuirk

Directed by Claire McCluskey

Acted by Derbhla Leddy and Raphaelle Peria

Edited by Sarah Murphy

… … …

shots:

1 long shot view of Raphaelle in kitchen, she walks towards camera and pans l-r as she goes in to room on right of screen

2 cut to long shot of Raphaelle on bed in the process of taking of her shoes, demonstrating a time crunch/compression (ie:walk from door to bed and beginning of taking off shoes has been omitted). She lifts blanket, gets into bed and pulls blanket around her

3 motion cut from long shot to close up of active process (Raphaelle pulling the blanket around her)

4 cut to close shot of Derbhla and Raphaelle from above lying in the bed

5 cut to long shot of bed, to demonstrate privacy/sleep

Our Match Cut Movie

… … …

Filmed by Sarah Murphy

Acted by Claire McCluskey, Derbhla Leddy, Raphaelle Peria and Monica McGuirk

Edited by Claire McCluskey, with editing process demonstrated to Sarah and Monica.

… … …

the shots we used are as follows:

1 close up shot of myself drinking from a cup - zoom in closer to focus attention on circular shape created by the mug

2 match cut by shape (circle of mug to circle of basketball), pan from right to left to follow progress of basketball going into hoop

3 motion cut (or as we thought a match cut by direction of movement and similar shape of ball and orange) to monica throwing and catching the orange

4 close up of throw and catch of orange, in which we aimed to match the direction of the movement

5 match cut of shape of orange back to beginning to complete the loop, establishing a connection between cup, ball and orange

Match Cutting

This is a technical term used when cutting between two scenes of a film. A match cut occurs when two scenes are “matched”, meaning that the object or action in the first shot is repeated to some degree in the second shot, be it that the objects in both shots are the same or similar, or that the composition, shapes, colour or movement of the first shot is matched by the second (known as a “graphic match”). In the case of the two shots compositional elements matching, this creates a strong continuity of action, which can allow the director to make a link between two otherwise disconnected objects to illustrate a point to the viewer, which is why this type of cut is also known as a ‘metaphor cut’.

"One of the most famous match cuts is in Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. Inspired by a mysterious black monolith, a primitive ape discovers the use of bones as weapons and throws a bone into the air after killing another ape. When the bone reaches its highest point, the shot cuts to that of a similarly-shaped space craft—an orbital nuclear weapons platform, as is made explicit in the book—floating through space. In highlighting their formal similarities, the match cut helps draw a connection between the two objects as exemplars of primitive and advanced tools respectively, and weapons at that. A “graphic match” occurs when shapes, colors and/or overall movement of shot A are matched with the composition of shot B.”

This is my group’s five shot movie for New Media. The shots we used are as follows;

1: A vertical pan of Derbhla from below (to make her appear intimidating to the viewer)

2: An over the shoulder shot of Sarah, looking scared and vulnerable

3: A panning view of Derbhla walking across the room toward Sarah

4: A point of view shot of Sarah, from above to give the impression to the viewer that she is scared / powerless

5: A reverse angle shot / reaction shot of  Derbhla, from below to once again indicate her position of power. She raises her hand and moves to smack at the camera, ie: Sarah. In this shot we improvised and covered the lens just before the slap would have made contact. The noise of the slap can still be heard, but by removing the visual we felt it added more dramatic effect than we could have achieved by filming the slap.

No Sarahs were harmed in the making of this movie.

To further illustrate my point, here is the start of my photo roman, with audio, photos and subtitles all included.It is only the start, due to time restrictions I haven’t got the rest of the subtitles and photowork done. The subtitles aren’t perfect, and sound continues on long after sound and then photos stop. But it displays my idea nonetheless, and I intend to finish it off.

Audio

For my narrated photo roman I enlisted the help of some of my friends. I sat them all down, everybody had a few drinks, and then I hit record on my mac and let them talk for a good half an hour. What resulted was a long conversation, using the most colloquially hilarious phrases found around our home town of Monaghan. The complete track goes on for quite a while, this is an edited summary of the banter.

I basically preformed a cut-and-paste job on it using Garage Band, a music editing program. My housemate and sound engineer-extraordinaire, Emily, then mastered the track using Logic; a better music editing program, and cleaned up the rough edges for me.

I intend to place this track over a slideshow of images that describe the settings and expressions that accompany this kind of “language”.

And I will also add subtitles, to translate.

The Audio File will be in the next post, because DIT internet doesn’t like it and won’t let me upload it >:(

Individual Photo Roman project, made into a Quicktime video, using Final Cut.

PhotoRoman group project…

Photo Roman With Audio - The “Gist”

Translating Monaghanese

For this photoroman exercise I am going to record a group of my fellow Monaghan people in conversation.

Then I am going to provide subtitles so everyone else can follow :)

With this film I want to explore themes of communication and translation, and how they can be affected by cultural differences. By using my home county of Monaghan, I wish to showcase how places- regardless of size- can build an identity through language and idiosyncratic expression.

In my approach to this, I do not intend to write a script, but rather encourage a group of fellow Monaghanites to engage in conversation, and ensure they include as many obscure and interesting Monaghan colloquialisms as they can think of.

For the duration of the conversation I will photograph their expressions and gestures. Their emotions and movements will communicate alongside what they’re saying.

Finally, to translate to the wider audience I will include subtitles to explain the dialogue, thus highlighting the cultural difference, and inviting the viewer into understanding the conversation.

Photos to Narrative